LCFF REVIEW and TALKING POINTS for ALL IB SCHOOLS


Lee Angela Reid, Senior Legislative Advocate CAPITOL ADVISORS GROUP and CAWS liaison has recommended the following “Talking Points” for all educators and stakeholders who support IB educations for students in California.

Under the Governor’s Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF), school districts and charter schools must adopt a Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP) by July 1, 2014. The LCAP must describe annual goals, for all students and for each LCFF subgroup, for each of the following state priorities as well as for any additional identified local priorities. The LCAP must also describe the specific actions that will be taken to achieve these goals and align to the district’s budget. Following are the eight state priorities:

  • Compliance with Williams criteria – instructional materials, teacher assignments and credentials, facilities
  • Implementation of SBE adopted academic content standards, including programs and services for ELs to access the common core and ELD standards
  • Parental involvement
  • Pupil achievement – statewide assessments, API, completion of A-G requirements, CTE sequences and advanced placement courses, EL progress toward proficiency, college preparation (Early Assessment Program)
  • Pupil engagement – attendance, dropout and graduation rates
  • School climate – suspension and expulsion rates, etc.
  • Access - including for subgroups and students with special needs, to a broad course of study in specified subject areas (English language arts, mathematics, social sciences, visual and performing arts, health and physical education)
  • Pupil outcomes in those specified subject areas

Your goal is to illustrate to the local board how and where the IB program fits. You need to show them that your program will help them to not only meet the state priorities, but also to better serve all students.

WHEN:

LCAPS must have input from a parent advisory committee. Districts must also notify the public of the opportunity to submit written comments on the draft as well as hold a public hearing for comment on the draft plan. So check with your board to see when those opportunities will be available.

January 31, 2014 – SBE regulation on use of supplement/concentration grant funds
March 31, 2014 – SBE template for LCAPs
July 1, 2014 – First LCA”s with 2014-2014 budget expenditures aligned to the LCAP
July 1, 2015 – First LCAP update with additional expenditure reporting
Oct. 1, 2015 SBE evaluation rubrics

WHAT TO SAY:

You need to tailor your comments so they are appropriate to your program and your school and/or district. There are some examples listed below but do not feel compelled to respond to each priority. For IB, the focus should be on pupil achievement, access and outcomes.

  • Compliance with Williams criteria – instructional materials, teacher assignments and credentials, facilities
  • Implementation of SBE adopted academic content standards, including programs and services for ELs to access the common core and ELD standards

Talk about how similar the methods are for teaching IB and teaching to the Common Core State Standards. Make them aware that IB was consulted during the creation of CCSS.

  • Parental involvement

Explain the level of involvement of parents of IB students in the program. Offer to work with them on the LCAP and to share with other parents. Offer to serve as a liaison to parent groups given your experience in the area.

Here you also want to engage your local ELAC group or equity groups in the conversation. Now that funds are available, shouldn’t there be more access to IB programs? I would suggest meeting with them and giving them a presentation on IB as well.

  • Pupil Achievement – statewide assessments, API, completion of A-G requirements, CTE sequences and advanced placement courses, EL progress toward proficiency, college preparation (Early Assessment Program)

You know (and they don’t) how IB programs help all students achieve. Talk about the need to “not stop at proficient” as the key is to measure growth! Share available data.

Also, remind them the API is being revised to include college and career indicators and that one of the indicators recommended for inclusion is IB. Schools and districts will receive additional points for IB programs.

  • Pupil engagement – attendance, dropout and graduation rates

Inform them how IB helps students who might otherwise drop out or have poor grades due to boredom, lack of engagement.

  • School climate – suspension and expulsion rates, etc.

They probably don’t think of high achieving students in this category, so you might share with them some of the behavior issues that arise when a student isn’t engaged.

  • Access, including for subgroups and students with special needs, to a broad course of study in specified subject areas
  • Pupil outcomes in those specified subject areas

These priorities were put in place to ensure that students had access to a broader curriculum and the focus wasn’t on math and English only. What better way to do that than through IB?

Share examples of the type of learning/projects to which an IB student has access. Why that type of education is imperative.

WHY YOU:

No one knows the value of your program better than you do! Help them to see the program, and its value through your eyes. Make it pertinent and make it personal. They have a huge task ahead of them and haven’t received a lot of guidance yet on how to tackle it. You can help them! Remember, they don’t know what they don’t know.

Finally, speaking to the board accomplishes two goals: 1) You make them aware of the value of your program and how it fits in with their responsibilities and 2) You make them aware that you are watching their actions. Local control means local accountability – they have to answer to you!

CHECK LIST OF ACTIONS and TALKING POINTS FROM YOUR CAWS BOARD:

  • Involve IB parents on district and school committees and pack board meeting that are establishing LCAP policies.
  • Present data on achievement of IB students and the groups that they represent on your campus. There are an increasing the number of EL and special ed students involved in IB programs. Tabulate specific numbers for your school.
  • IB students will be well prepared to meet CCSS. IB incorporates CCSS. Talk about how similar the methods are for teaching IB and teaching to the Common Core State Standards. Make them aware that IB was consulted during the creation of CCSS. IB annual fees include access to OCC and much professional development that will aid districts in adopting common core. Be sure to emphasize how IB is also more than common core. You don't want your district to say why do we need IB if we are adopting common core.
  • IB teachers are already trained in CCSS strategies and assessments. Emphasize the value of IB teacher training and how IB teaching strategies are used by our IB teachers in their non-IB classes. IB teaching raises the bar for all students.
  • IB should also be a presence in this process so that access to "rigor", college prep, IB, is part of the district plan or vision. The LCAP draft and a second round of input will come next and IB needs to be written into the district document.
  • Offering the opportunity for students to have access to any IB class helps to keep students engaged and may increase confidence as they build success, common core skills, and preparation for life beyond high school. Stress the qualitative value of IB learning.
  • DP schools should highlight the state admission acceptances that were reported in the 2012 Destination Survey. Further IBA publications will be available in Feb. 2014 with data specific to CA schools.
  • Give some examples of learning/projects that IB students do. One good example might be Math Studies and Math projects/internal assessments.

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